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Don’t forget Lorna Landvik coming to the library this Saturday!

llandvikMinnesota resident, author and comedian Lorna Landvik will be at the library this Saturday, September 14, at 10am in the library’s Foot Room. She will discuss her latest book, Chronicles of a Radical Hag, a bittersweet, seriously funny novel of a life, a small town, and a key to our troubled times, raced through a newspaper columnist’s half-century of taking in, and taking on, the world. She’ll also share her excitement about an upcoming short film based on her Depression era novel Oh My Stars. Ms. Landvik has visited our library before, to rave reviews. Don’t miss your chance to hear this talented and hilarious author!

 

Song for a Whale by Lynne Kelly

Iris is having a tough year.  The only Deaf kid in her school, the only person she really has to talk to during the day is her interpreter, Mr. Charles, despite her classmate Nina’s extra-annoying attempts to show off her fake sign language (and her teacher’s even more annoying refusal to acknowledge that Nina is a faker).  Iris really wants to go to Bridgewood, a school with a big Deaf education program across town, but her parents don’t seem to understand why she would want to be with other kids like her.  And, to make everything worse, her grandpa recently passed away, and Iris misses him like crazy – but her grandma misses him even more.  Lately, it seems like Grandma is sad and lonely all the time – kind of like how Iris feels about school, but worse.  And, to top it all off, after a lunch time disaster with Nina, now Iris is grounded from her beloved antique radio repair business.

So, when Iris learns about Blue 55 in science class, she knows she has to figure out a way to help him.  A hybrid blue and fin whale, Blue 55 sings at a different, completely unique frequency than the other whales in the ocean, which means no one can understand him – no matter how often, or how loud, he sings his song, the other whales can’t send it back to him.  After she reads a blog post about a failed attempt to attach a tracker to Blue 55 by a nature sanctuary in Alaska, Iris starts to talk with one of the scientists working to track the lonely whale.  With her knowledge of frequencies, radios, computers, and a little help from her school’s music class, she designs a song for Blue 55 to let him know he’s not alone in the ocean.  Iris knows she has to play it for him – but how can one twelve-year-old girl get herself, and her song, from Texas to Alaska, especially during the school year?

With a little ingenuity, a lot of determination, and one wily grandma, Iris sets out on a journey to show a whale he’s not alone in the dark – and, along the way, she discovers that she might not be so alone either.

Based on a real whale, 52 Blue, Song for a Whale is a gem of a novel.  Fierce, smart, and very stubborn Iris is still trying to figure out how to navigate her world and communicate with a world that often seems to be vibrating on a very different frequency than she is.  With her good friend Wendell, loyal big brother Tristan, and sign language karaoke queen grandma by her side, though, she’s a force to be reckoned with.  With tons of science (and whales!), this story about family, friendship, and finding your place in the world is sure to strike a chord with tech and animal lovers alike.  Check it out!

Wanderers by Chuck Wendig

everythingEvery so often I like to read a good post-apocalyptic novel – among other things, it makes me appreciate all the more the life I have now. This book, though – whew! It hits a little too close to the here and now for my comfort, but I put it right up there with King’s The Stand in my post-apocalypse Hall of Fame. Publisher’s Weekly wrote “Wendig pulls no punches in this blockbuster apocalyptic novel, which confronts some of the darkest and most divisive aspects of present-day America with urgency, humanity, and hope. The day after a comet blazes over the west coast of North America, Benji Ray, a disgraced former CDC epidemiologist, is summoned to meet Black Swan, a superintelligent computer designed to predict and prevent disasters, which has determined that Benji must treat an upcoming pandemic. That same morning, Shana wakes up to find her little sister, Nessie, sleepwalking down the driveway and off toward an unknown goal, one of a growing number of similar travelers who are unable to stop or to wake. Shana in turn becomes one of many shepherds, protecting the travelers from a crumbling American society that’s ravaged by fear, dogma, disease, and the effects of climate change, while Benji grapples with his daunting assignment and questions about Black Swan’s nature and agenda. Wendig challenges readers with twists and revelations that probe issues of faith and free will while crafting a fast-paced narrative with deeply real characters. His politics are unabashed-characters include a populist president brought to power by neo-Nazis, as well as murderous religious zealots-but not simplistic, and he tackles many moral questions while eschewing easy answers. This career-defining epic deserves its inevitable comparisons to Stephen King’s The Stand, easily rising above the many recent novels of pandemic and societal collapse.”